Friday, October 13, 2017

Kick Off Your Boots!

Your favorite little cowboy or cowgirl will love these prints! Barbara J. Eikmeier's Kick Off Your Boots collection has western flair in a patriotic color palette. We asked Barb to tell us about the inspiration for her new fabric line.
 

Q. Where did the inspiration for Kick Off Your Boots come from?
BE: I have a huge bag of scrap fabrics, and I found a small piece of a western fabric in there—probably from the 40s or 50s. When I pulled it out, I got this big smile on my face and thought it would be a cute reproduction line.


Q. Tell us about the color palette.
BE: The colors are red and blue so that the fabrics can cross over into patriotic. The idea for the green came from the original western print. I like the addition.


Q. Can you talk to us about the coordinating prints?
BE: Reproduction print collections typically fall into eras, but this one doesn’t. I like to say this collection has three different eras.

The horseshoe print was an indigo print from sometime between 1880 and 1910. The original had a little vine swirling in the background with leaves on it; in this fabric it’s stars instead.


The bandana print is probably from the 1970s.



Stars help with the patriotic feel for the line, but stars always go well in western collections.



The plaid has a little star in it as well, and it’s a second print that brings in the green. The original plaid we looked at was much larger and straight, rather than on the diagonal.



Q. Do you have a favorite print?
BE: I love the paisleys and the handkerchief. And the cowboy print, and the plaid. I guess I really like them all—I think the fabrics are whimsical and fun.



Barb designed a free quilt pattern for this project, The Cowboy Quilt. 
It uses all the SKUs from the collection and measures 78" square. 
Find the free quilt pattern here.

See the entire collection here and ask for it at your local quilt shop. 


2 comments:

  1. Like this fabric line. It is so nice to have the country aspect represented.

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  2. Oh goody, a 19th Century repro conversational!!!!!

    ReplyDelete